Halloween Art.

Mimmo Paladino- Fine Art Print- Zane Bennett Contemporary Art- Santa Fe New Mexico

Mimmo Paladino, Atlantico VI (Skeleton)linoleum block print, 74.25 x 23 in., 1987

Halloween is upon us, so we conjured a batch of spooky art from the Zane Bennett Contemporary collection. Behold Jim Dine’s raven à la Edgar Allan Poe, a spider web by Vija Celmins, a marionette masquerading as Frida Kahlo by Armond Lara, and other dark, mysterious creations. Trick or treat!

James Drake Prints- Zane Bennett Contemporary Art- Santa Fe New Mexico

James Drake
Salon of a Thousand Souls
lithograph
57 x 43 in.
1996

Armond Lara Sculpture- Zane Bennett Contemporary Art- Santa Fe New Mexico

Armond Lara
Marionette “As Frida”
wood and mixed media
36 x 15.50 x 16 in.

Manuel Amorim- Woodcut- Zane Bennett Contemporary Art- Santa Fe New Mexico

Manuel Amorim
Metamorphose
woodcut
17.75 x 11.75 in.

Vija Celmins- Fine Art Print- Zane Bennett Contemporary Art- Santa Fe New Mexico

Vija Celmins
Spider Web
serigraph
10.88 x 13 in.
2009

Jim Dine- Lithograph- Zane Bennett Contemporary Art- Santa Fe New Mexico

Jim Dine
Sun’s Night Glow
lithograph
35.5 x 51.5 in.
2000

Juan Jose Molina- Fine Art Print- Zane Bennett Contemporary Art- Santa Fe New Mexico

Juan Jose Molina
Untitled
lithograph
34 x 24.25 in.
1998

Click here to browse the complete Zane Bennett Contemporary collection.

Ed Ruscha’s Hourglass.

Ed Ruscha Artwork- Zane Bennett Contemporary- Fine Art Prints
Ed Ruscha, Relos Arena (HC), 1988, lithograph, 30 x 22 in

Despite being credited with a Pop sensibility, Ed Ruscha (b. 1937) defies categorization with his diverse output of photographic books and tongue-in-cheek photo-collages, paintings, and drawings. Ruscha’s work is inspired by the ironies and idiosyncrasies of life in Los Angeles, which he often conveys by placing glib words and colloquial phrases atop photographic images or fields of color. Known for painting and drawing with unusual materials such as gunpowder, blood, and Pepto Bismol, Ruscha draws attention to the deterioration of language and pervasive clichés in pop culture.

Ruscha’s lithograph Relos Arena is new to the Zane Bennett Contemporary collection. The artist’s bold style and idiosyncratic splatter effects are on dynamic display in the piece, but it also possesses an elegance and subtlety that echoes its subject matter. Scroll down to view detail images of this work, and click here to inquire now.

Ed Ruscha- Hourglass Print- Detail- Zane Bennett Contemporary Art

Ed Ruscha- Hourglass Print- Detail- Zane Bennett Contemporary Art

Ed Ruscha- Hourglass Print- Detail- Zane Bennett Contemporary Art

Art in Monochrome.


“Black is a property, not a quality,” Richard Serra (b. 1938) said. “A black shape can hold its space and place in relation to a larger volume and alter the mass of that volume readily.” Even in his two-dimensional artworks, Serra wields black forms as though they possess literal mass and volume.

Scroll down to view artwork from Serra and other masters of monochrome.


Richard Serra
Paths and Edges #13
Etching on buff Lanaquarelle watercolor paper
23.50 x 35.25 in

“In terms of weight, black is heavier, creates a larger volume, holds itself in a more compressed field. […] Since black is the densest color material, it absorbs and dissipates light to a maximum and thereby changes the artificial as well as the natural light in a given room.”


Vija Celmins
Spider Web
serigraph
10.88 x 13 in

“I did a whole series of black works—I don’t know now—twenty, thirty works. I thought it was quite difficult to make a black painting work because it has such an incredibly strong silhouette, you know? But it did a series of things. It invited you closer and closer to the work. I don’t know what I think about that yet, but I thought it was sort of an interesting phenomena that happened.”


Martin Puryear
Untitled LP 2
etching
17.87 x 23.75 in

“There is the potential for much more spontaneity with prints than there is with the sculpture, which tends to be very slow, accretive kind of process-labor intensive.”


Armond Lara
Bowl of Cherries
Graphite on paper
40.50 x 55 in

“I look for interesting shapes. I just start putting these things down on a piece of handmade paper, and then it’s a process of elimination to find a focal point for the piece. Then I find other things to add that make the central object out of context. What I want is surprise, surprise and strong composition, and to get that I need tension.”

Works by Antonio Segui.

Antonio Seguí (b. 1934) is a painter and printmaker whose vivid, often satirical figurative works focus on the people and vistas of modern urban life. He’s inspired by comic strip characters, texts, arrows and various signs, juxtaposed onto the figures that resemble comic strip-style language. Born and raised in Cordoba, Argentina, Seguí has maintained a serious art practice since he was a teenager. His early work was influenced by the Cubists, Fernand Léger and Diego Rivera.

In 1957, Seguí had his first solo exhibition in Cordoba at the age of 23. He moved to Mexico the following year, where he studied printmaking. After a brief return to Argentina, he moved to Paris in 1963, where he lives and works today. He has exhibited at galleries and institutions throughout the world. In 2005, his work was the subject of a retrospective at the Musée National d’Art Moderne, Centre Georges Pompidou, in Paris. Scroll down to see works by Seguí from the Zane Bennett Contemporary collection, and click here to learn more on our website.

Antonio Seguí
Las Cuates Esquinas
color lithograph
25.50 x 23.63 in

Antonio Seguí
Cache-Cache
color lithograph
15.81 x 22.93 in

Antonio Seguí
On Attend
color lithograph
22.37 x 19.18 in

Antonio Seguí
Cache-Cache
color lithograph
15.81 x 22.93 in