Guy Dill Paints in the Air.

Guy Dill Sculpture outside of Zane Bennett Contemporary Art- Santa Fe New Mexico

Guy Dill (b. 1946) doesn’t make preparatory sketches for his sculptures. He paints or prints abstract imagery, and then captures the flowing motion of the pigment in three dimensions. “I knew I had to discuss painting in a sculptural way,” the California artist explains. He started his art career in New York City—Donald Judd was an early benefactor—but settled in Los Angeles in the 1970’s. “New York is about New York, and LA is about the world,” he quips.

From his West Coast home, Dill has indeed conquered the globe with his monumental sculptures in bronze, aluminum and marble. He’s mounted over 50 one-man exhibitions, and appears in the permanent collections of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, the Museum of Modern Art, and the Stedelijk Museum. Dill’s artworks in the Zane Bennett Contemporary collection exemplify the complete span of his process, from his initial explorations in two dimensions to a sculptural expression that towers above the viewer.

Guy Dill Sculpture- Zane Bennett Contemporary Art- Santa Fe New Mexico
Guy Dill, Boon, bronze, 120 x 70 x 60 in., 2008
Guy Dill- Fine Art Print- Zane Bennett Contemporary Art- Santa Fe New Mexico
Guy Dill, Untitled RTP, lithograph, 26 x 34 in, 2009
Guy Dill- Fine Art Print- Zane Bennett Contemporary Art- Santa Fe New Mexico
Guy Dill, Untitled RTP, lithograph, 26 x 26 in., 2009
Guy Dill- Fine Art Print- Zane Bennett Contemporary Art- Santa Fe New Mexico
Guy Dill, Untitled RTP, lithograph, 26 x 34 in., 2009

Click here to browse the complete Zane Bennett Contemporary collection.

Ellsworth Kelly in Blue.

Ellsworth Kelly Portrait- Zane Bennett Contemporary Art- Santa Fe New Mexico
“I think that if you can turn off the mind and look only with the eyesultimately everything becomes abstract,” said Ellsworth Kelly (1923 – 2015). Kelly’s abstraction is rooted in the real world. His strong sense of form and color has often been tied to his time in the military, affinity for bird watching, and observations of nature. Although simplistic in imagery, Kelly’s work holds a certain tension. “I think what we all want from art is a sense of fixity, a sense of opposing the chaos of daily living,” said Kelly. “This an illusion, of course. Canvas rots. Paint changes color. In a sense, what I’ve tried to capture is the reality of flux, to keep art an open, incomplete situation, to get at the rapture ofseeing.”

Kelly was a pioneer of Color Field painting and minimalism whose influence extends across the second half the 20th century to the present.This is exemplified by the story behind Kelly’s Untitled (1983), a hand-signed lithograph that was included in the Eight by Eight to Celebrate the Temporary Contemporary suite. The portfolio features artwork by eight prominent artists, and was used as a fundraising vehicle for the Museum of Contemporary Art (MOCA) in Los Angeles. The artists who participated were Kelly, Richard Diebenkorn, Sam Francis, David Hockney, Robert Rauschenberg, Niki de Saint Phalle, Jean Tinguely, and Andy Warhol. This iconic collection is a testament to the cultural milieu of the United States in the 1980’s. This is a rare opportunity to own a piece of this illustrious history.

Photo Credit: Fred R. Conrad/The New York Times
Ellsworth Kelly- Color Lithograph- Eight by Eight- Zane Bennett Contemporary Art- Santa Fe New Mexico

Ellsworth Kelly
Untitled (Eight by Eight to Celebrate the Temporary Contemporary)
color lithograph
29 x 41 in.
year: 1983

Click here to browse the complete Zane Bennett Contemporary Art collection.