TASCHEN at Zane Bennett.

 

Murals of Tibet by TASCHEN at Zane Bennet Gallery
Murals of Tibet.

 

Lovers of beautiful books, rejoice! Zane Bennett Contemporary Art is now an official seller of TASCHEN Books, the revolutionary German imprint that deserves its own art museum. TASCHEN has collaborated with the likes of David HockneyChristo & Jeanne-Claude and Beatriz Milhazes to produce limited edition books that are true works of art. We’re particularly excited about their new title Murals of Tibet, an epic chronicle of some of the greatest treasures of Buddhist culture and Tibetan heritage.

For more than a decade, photographer Thomas Laird traveled the length, breadth, and far-flung corners of Tibet’s plateau to capture the land’s spectacular Buddhist murals. Deploying new multi-image digital photography, Laird compiled the world’s first archive of these artworks, some walls as wide as 10 meters, in life-size resolution. In recognition of this World Heritage landmark and preservation of Tibetan culture, His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama has signed all copies of this Collector’s Edition. As pictured, Murals of Tibetcomes with a stand designed by Pritzker Prize-winning architect and humanitarian pioneer Shigeru Ban.

Click the images below to view more books from TASCHEN, now available from Zane Bennett Contemporary Art. Browse all of our TASCHEN titles and other books in our online shop.

 

 

David Hockney TASCHEN Book at Zane Bennett David Hockney, A Bigger Book

Andy Warhol TASCHEN book at Zane Bennett Gallery
Andy Warhol, Seven Illustrated Books, 1952 – 1959

 

TASCHEN book by Christopher Wool at Santa Fe gallery
Christopher Wool

 

The Gates by Christo and Jeanne-Claude book at Zane Bennett
Christo and Jeanne-Claude. The Gates

 

TASCHEN book Beatriz Millhazes at Zane Bennett
Beatriz Milhazes

Helen Frankenthaler’s Yellow Jack.


“My pictures are full of climates, abstract climates. They’re not nature per se, but a feeling,” said Helen Frankenthaler (1928-2011). A second-generation Abstract Expressionist painter, Frankenthaler became active in the New York School of the 1950s, initially influenced by artists like Jackson Pollock, Willem de Kooning and Arshile Gorky. She gained prominence with her invention of the color-stain technique—applying thin washes of paint to unprimed canvas—in her iconic Mountains and Sea (1952).

Frankenthaler’s works balance abstraction with elements of landscape and figuration, as seen in her 1987 lithograph Yellow Jack. The work transports the viewer to a calm seashore—or perhaps a cool desert—after dusk, with the rising moon’s bright yellow light bleeding from the composition’s edges. “This complicated relationship to landscape presents a constant tension in her art,” notes the Clark Art Institute in the exhibition materials for their current show, As In Nature: Helen Frankenthaler Paintings. “[Her works] are primarily abstract, yet reveal recognizable elements from the landscape that function, paradoxically, to reinforce their abstraction: as in nature, but not as in nature.”

Image: Helen Frankenthaler, Yellow Jack, 1987, lithograph, 30 x 36 in.

New Robert Rauschenberg Acquisitions.

“My whole area of art has always been addressed to working with other people,” said Robert Rauschenberg (1925-2008). “Ideas are not real estate.” It’s this collaborative philosophy that inspired MoMA’s Robert Rauschenberg: Among Friends, the first retrospective of the American artist’s work in the 21st century. The museum calls the show an “open monograph,” with Rauschenberg’s work appearing alongside the art of his contemporaries. It’s a labyrinthine flow chart of ideas, which is also an apt way to describe his prints.

Just as Rauschenberg incorporated everyday objects into his iconic assemblages, he brought quotidian imagery crashing together through printmaking. He often incorporated his own photographs and found images, electrifying them with colorful, exuberant marks. In Rauschenberg’s prints, we sense his dual role as a disruptor of Abstract Expressionism and a progenitor of Pop Art. We’ve added two new prints by Rauschenberg to the Zane Bennett Contemporary collection. Scroll down to view Earth Day and Arcanum V, and click here to browse all of our artwork by Rauschenberg.


Robert Rauschenberg
Arcanum V (from Arcanum Series), 1981
Color silkscreen with hand-coloring and collage on paper
Published and printed by Styria Studio, New York
#12 of 85
Signed and dated with edition in graphite lower right sheet; Styria
Studio blind stamp lower right sheet
Image/sheet: 22.5″ x 15.5″; Frame: 31.25″ x 24.25″

 


Robert Rauschenberg
Earth Day, 1990
Color silkscreen and color pochoir on wove paper pencil
sheet: 64.25″ h x 42.75″ w overall (with frame): 68.25″ h x 46.5″ w

Rauschenberg was an avid environmental activist. In 1970, he created a print for the inaugural Earth Day. Twenty years later, he observed Earth Day 1990—which vaulted the celebration onto the world stage, with over 200 million participants—by creating this color silkscreen.

Sam Francis.

“Painting is about the beauty of space and the power of containment,” said Sam Francis (1923-1994). The artist is best known for abstract, mural-sized canvases on which thin washes, drips and splatters of primary colors float within vast areas of white space—a format emphasized in his iconic series of “Edge Paintings.” The monumentality of his paintings places them within the tradition of Abstract Expressionist pictures, which fill the viewer’s field of vision with a direct experience of color and movement.

Francis’ 1970’s color lithograph Cut Throat is the newest addition to the Zane Bennett Contemporary collection. Look below to learn more, and click here to browse more work by Sam Francis in the Zane Bennett Contemporary collection.

Sam Francis
Cut Throat AP V
Color Lithograph
45.25 x 31.25 in