Turrell’s Pantheon.

James Turrell- Zane Bennett Contemporary Art- Santa Fe New Mexico

“I like to use light as a material, but my medium is actually perception,” said James Turrell (b. 1943). “I want you to sense yourself sensing —to see yourself seeing.” Turrell’s exhibition at the Guggenheim in 2013 was his first solo display in New York City since the 1980’s, and he was ready to catch Manhattan’s eye. In his skyscape titled Aten Reign, the Light and Space artist transformed the museum’s iconic rotunda into an enormous oculus that could only be viewed from the ground floor. The installation emanated the full spectrum of color, hypnotically shifting from hue to hue.

Aten Reign, a series of suspended oval armatures and sheer scrims that span the entire cavity of the building, is so overwhelming, meditative, beautiful and suited to the space that you actually forget you’re in the Guggenheim, where it’s almost architecturally impossible to do so,” wrote Times Quotidian of the work. Turrell joked that Frank Lloyd Wright might not have approved of this radical alteration of the structure’s design. His revolutionary but ephemeral artistic statement is captured in this large-scale archival pigment print. Like the masterwork it depicts, this 44-by-65-inch piece has its own gravitational pull.

Above: James Turrell.

James Turrell- Aten Reign Archival Pigment Print- Guggenheim Museum- Zane Bennett Contemporary Art

James Turrell
Aten Reign
archival pigment print
44 x 65 in.
2015

Click here to browse the complete Zane Bennett Contemporary Art collection.

Artists Rising.

Mike Rottenberg and Reynier Leyva Novo- Rising Artists- Zane Bennett Contemporary Art- Santa Fe New Mexico

Mika Rottenberg (b. 1976, Argentina) and Reynier Leyva Novo (b. 1983, Cuba) are hardly emerging artists. They’ve both exhibited at the Venice Biennale, and have artwork in the permanent collections of renowned institutions across the world. Recently, each of them have marked yet another important milestone in their artistic careers: they’ve landed major solo displays.

Rottenberg’s self-titled exhibition at the Bass Museum in Miami Beach (on view through April 30) focuses on elucidating the mechanics of late-stage, global capitalism by way of absurd and poetic comparisons. Novo mounted a solo presentation of his work at The Armory Show in New York early this year, hot off the heels of his contribution to the Cuban Pavilion at the 57th Venice Biennale last summer. His work challenges ideology and symbols of power, uprooting notions of an individual’s ability to affect change. Rottenberg and Novo’s respective artistic quests ring clear in these works on paper from the Zane Bennett Contemporary collection. Consider acquiring art by two rising creative luminaries!

Images: Mika Rottenberg (l) & Juan Carlos Alom

Mika Rottenberg- Drawing- Zane Bennett Contemporary Art- Santa Fe New Mexico

Mika Rottenberg
U5
graphite, acrylic and colored pencil on paper
12.5 x 16.75 in.
2008

Reynier Leyva Novo- Fine Art Print- Zane Bennett Contemporary Art- Santa Fe New Mexico

Reynier Leyva Novo
50 + 10
cut vinyl on paper
25.62 x 19.75 in.
2011

Reynier Leyva Novo- Fine Art Print- Zane Bennett Contemporary Art- Santa Fe New Mexico

Reynier Leyva Novo
Power or Justice
cut vinyl on paper
25.62 x 19.75 in.
2011

Reynier Leyva Novo- Fine Art Print- Zane Bennett Contemporary Art- Santa Fe New Mexico

Reynier Leyva Novo
Long Live the Heroine
cut vinyl on paper
25.62 x 19.75 in.
2011

Click here to browse the complete Zane Bennett Contemporary Art collection.

Guy Dill Paints in the Air.

Guy Dill Sculpture outside of Zane Bennett Contemporary Art- Santa Fe New Mexico

Guy Dill (b. 1946) doesn’t make preparatory sketches for his sculptures. He paints or prints abstract imagery, and then captures the flowing motion of the pigment in three dimensions. “I knew I had to discuss painting in a sculptural way,” the California artist explains. He started his art career in New York City—Donald Judd was an early benefactor—but settled in Los Angeles in the 1970’s. “New York is about New York, and LA is about the world,” he quips.

From his West Coast home, Dill has indeed conquered the globe with his monumental sculptures in bronze, aluminum and marble. He’s mounted over 50 one-man exhibitions, and appears in the permanent collections of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, the Museum of Modern Art, and the Stedelijk Museum. Dill’s artworks in the Zane Bennett Contemporary collection exemplify the complete span of his process, from his initial explorations in two dimensions to a sculptural expression that towers above the viewer.

Guy Dill Sculpture- Zane Bennett Contemporary Art- Santa Fe New Mexico
Guy Dill, Boon, bronze, 120 x 70 x 60 in., 2008
Guy Dill- Fine Art Print- Zane Bennett Contemporary Art- Santa Fe New Mexico
Guy Dill, Untitled RTP, lithograph, 26 x 34 in, 2009
Guy Dill- Fine Art Print- Zane Bennett Contemporary Art- Santa Fe New Mexico
Guy Dill, Untitled RTP, lithograph, 26 x 26 in., 2009
Guy Dill- Fine Art Print- Zane Bennett Contemporary Art- Santa Fe New Mexico
Guy Dill, Untitled RTP, lithograph, 26 x 34 in., 2009

Click here to browse the complete Zane Bennett Contemporary collection.

Sam Francis in Winter.

Sam Francis- Artist Portrait- Photo by Meibao D. Nee.- Zane Bennett Contemporary Art

“Ideas hang around images like shadows,” said Sam Francis (1923-1994). “The space at the center of these paintings is reserved for you.”  The quote seems particularly apt when it comes to the abstract expressionist’s aquatint “The Five Continents in Wintertime.” Francis employs his idiosyncratic drips and splatters, but pulls back his typically vibrant palette to reflect the purple, blue and brown tones of bare branches set against winter skies. Between these cool winter “shadows,” a field of snowy white paper shows through.

Francis was born in San Mateo, California. He was initially influenced by the work of abstract expressionists such as Mark Rothko, Arshile Gorky and Clyfford Still. While living in Paris in the 1950’s, he became associated with Tachisme. Tachisme was a reaction to cubism and is characterized by spontaneous brushwork, drips and blobs of paint straight from the tube, and sometimes scribbling reminiscent of calligraphy. Francis spent his time in Paris executing entirely monochromatic works, but his mature pieces are generally large oil paintings with splashed or splattered areas of bright contrasting color. Areas of white canvas are often left to show through, and in later works, paint is sometimes confined to the edges of the canvas. Scroll down to view “The Five Continents in Wintertime” and other works by Sam Francis.

Image: Meibao D. Nee.

Sam Francis- The Five Continents in Wintertime- Zane Bennett Contemporary Art- Santa Fe New Mexico

Sam Francis
The Five Continents in Wintertime
aquatint, 23.75in x 48.75in
1984

Sam Francis- Color Lithograph- Zane Bennett Contemporary Art- Santa Fe New Mexico

Sam Francis
Untitled
color lithograph, 30 x 20 in.
1968

Sam Francis
Untitled #5, from Pasadena Box
lithograph, 11 x 15 in.
1963

Click here to browse the complete Zane Bennett Contemporary collection.