Turrell’s Pantheon.

James Turrell- Zane Bennett Contemporary Art- Santa Fe New Mexico

“I like to use light as a material, but my medium is actually perception,” said James Turrell (b. 1943). “I want you to sense yourself sensing —to see yourself seeing.” Turrell’s exhibition at the Guggenheim in 2013 was his first solo display in New York City since the 1980’s, and he was ready to catch Manhattan’s eye. In his skyscape titled Aten Reign, the Light and Space artist transformed the museum’s iconic rotunda into an enormous oculus that could only be viewed from the ground floor. The installation emanated the full spectrum of color, hypnotically shifting from hue to hue.

Aten Reign, a series of suspended oval armatures and sheer scrims that span the entire cavity of the building, is so overwhelming, meditative, beautiful and suited to the space that you actually forget you’re in the Guggenheim, where it’s almost architecturally impossible to do so,” wrote Times Quotidian of the work. Turrell joked that Frank Lloyd Wright might not have approved of this radical alteration of the structure’s design. His revolutionary but ephemeral artistic statement is captured in this large-scale archival pigment print. Like the masterwork it depicts, this 44-by-65-inch piece has its own gravitational pull.

Above: James Turrell.

James Turrell- Aten Reign Archival Pigment Print- Guggenheim Museum- Zane Bennett Contemporary Art

James Turrell
Aten Reign
archival pigment print
44 x 65 in.
2015

Click here to browse the complete Zane Bennett Contemporary Art collection.

Helen Frankenthaler’s Reflections.

Helen Frankenthaler- Works on Paper- Zane Bennett Contemporary Arts- Santa Fe New Mexico

“A really good picture looks as if it has happened at once,” said Helen Frankenthaler (1928-2011). “It’s an immediate image.” The West Coast artist developed an entire painting technique around this idea. By thinning her oils with turpentine or water and splashing them across canvases, she created abstract images that possessed the immediacy she was after. Famed art critic Clement Greenberg heralded her “soak-stain” compositions as the next step in abstract expressionism’s evolution, after Jackson Pollock’s breakthrough drip paintings rocked the world.

“When Greenberg brought the abstract painters Kenneth Noland and Morris Louis to Frankenthaler’s studio in 1953, they seized upon both her technique and the broad, flat expanses of color she created,” writes Jon Mann for Artsy. “Greenberg was quick to… highlight a second impulse and aesthetic in Abstract Expressionism—Color Field Painting—of which Frankenthaler would be a leading exponent for over a decade.” Frankenthaler’s lithograph Reflections X exemplifies the flowing, lyrical nature of her best paintings. It’s from her Reflections series, 12 lithographs that she made with Tyler Graphics in 1995. Scroll down to see the new piece, and two other prints from the Zane Bennett Contemporary collection.

Helen Frankenthaler- Reflections X- Series Lithograph- Zane Bennett Contemporary Art

Helen Frankenthaler
Reflections X
lithograph
14.75 x 11.75 in.

Helen Frankenthaler- Yellow Jack- Lithograph- Zane Bennett Contemporary Art

Helen Frankenthaler
Yellow Jack
lithograph
30 x 38 in
1987

Helen Frankenthaler
The Clearing
woodcut
16.75 x 21 in

Click here to learn more about artwork by Helen Frankenthaler in the Zane Bennett Contemporary Collection.