Blog

  • THE DARKNESS IN RED | ANISH KAPOOR
  • INTERVIEW WITH A CURATOR | STITCHED INK
  • HELEN FRANKENTHALER | VEILS OF COLOR
  • BRIDGET RILEY | KALEIDOSCOPE COLOR
  • ALEX KATZ | THE CONSCIOUS NOW
  • EL ANATSUI | BLUE VARIATION
  • LESLEY DILL: EMOTIVE EFFECTS
  • by Jordan Eddy
    JAMES TURRELL PANTHEON
  • by Jordan Eddy
    ARTURO HERRERA IN MOTION

    “Being Latin American, you are made up of so many fragments from different cultures,” Arturo Herrera (b. 1959) told Art21 in a documentary called Play. The sequence shows the Venezuela-born, New York and Berlin-based artist sifting through an enormous pile of clippings from paintings, drawings, and printed materials. These are the puzzle pieces for his abstract collages, which incorporate undulating forms and dazzling colors into compositions that almost seem to emit an exuberant hum.

     

    Herrera’s editioned, mixed-media collage Johannes is one such visual chorus. Created over two years in collaboration with the printers at Pace Editions, Johannes is a tour de force of printmaking experimentation. This mixed-media collage is composed of more than 100 separately printed elements in various printmaking techniques, including etching, aquatint, linocut, letterpress, collagraph, silkscreen and digital pigment print. Watch this video from Pace that details the fascinating process.

     

  • by Jordan Eddy
    REMEMBERING MONA LISA

    “Very quickly, a painting is turned into a facsimile of itself,” said Robert Rauschenberg (1925-2008). “One becomes so familiar with it that one recognizes it without looking at it.” He could’ve been talking about Leonardo da Vinci’s Mona Lisa, which makes a cameo in his 1996 intaglio print Banco, from Ground Rules. The portrait is so rooted in the modern cultural consciousness that we can instantly conjure it in our mind’s eye.

     

    Thus, it’s a perfect tool for exploring the concept of authorship: the painting appears next to a window emblazoned with the words “YOUR NAME HERE.” By presenting the world’s most iconic painting beside advertising lingo, the postmodern master asks whether true ownership of an image is possible in the age of mass media. Learn more about the print below, and browse more works by Rauschenberg.

  • by Jordan Eddy
    OLAFUR ELIASSON'S BERLIN

    Danish-Icelandic artist Olafur Eliasson (b. 1967) turns a city skyline on its head in his mercurial artwork Your reversed Berlin sphere. The larger image shows Berlin from the window of Eliasson’s studio, with a smaller, inverted version of the same view embedded in its center. The artist uses color-effect filter glass to imbue the underlying C-Print with chameleonic properties: as the light shifts, the central disc reflects a vivid rainbow of yellows, oranges, pinks, purples and blues. It’s as though this iconic metropolis has cast its reflection in a glacial lake at sunset. The glass also acts as a mirror, allowing the viewer to glimpse their reflection hanging above the scene.

     

    Eliasson’s art is driven by his interests in perception, movement, embodied experience, and feelings of self. He is perhaps best known for his gargantuan artwork The Weather Project in the Turbine Hall of Tate Modern, London. The 2003 installation turned the 35,520-square-foot exhibition space into a cradle for a sculptural depiction of the glowing sun. “Eliasson views the weather – wind, rain, sun – as one of the few fundamental encounters with nature that can still be experienced in the city,” writes Tate Modern. “Eliasson has sought to bring a part of London into the building, and through the experience and memory of the work, a part of it is taken back out into the city by the viewer.” Your reversed Berlin sphere evokes an elemental experience of another iconic European city. It’s an ever-shifting window into Berlin, with infinite visual appeal.

  • by Jordan Eddy
    ARTISTS RISING

    Mika Rottenberg (b. 1976, Argentina) and Reynier Leyva Novo (b. 1983, Cuba) are hardly emerging artists. They’ve both exhibited at the Venice Biennale, and have artwork in the permanent collections of renowned institutions across the world. Recently, each of them have marked yet another important milestone in their artistic careers: they’ve landed major solo displays.

     

    Rottenberg’s self-titled exhibition at the Bass Museum in Miami Beach (on view through April 30) focuses on elucidating the mechanics of late-stage, global capitalism by way of absurd and poetic comparisons. Novo mounted a solo presentation of his work at The Armory Show in New York early this year, hot off the heels of his contribution to the Cuban Pavilion at the 57th Venice Biennale last summer. His work challenges ideology and symbols of power, uprooting notions of an individual’s ability to affect change. Rottenberg and Novo’s respective artistic quests ring clear in these works on paper from the Zane Bennett Contemporary collection. Consider acquiring art by two rising creative luminaries!

  • by Jordan Eddy
    GUY DILL PAINTS IN THE AIR

    Guy Dill (b. 1946) doesn’t make preparatory sketches for his sculptures. He paints or prints abstract imagery, and then captures the flowing motion of the pigment in three dimensions. “I knew I had to discuss painting in a sculptural way,” the California artist explains. He started his art career in New York City—Donald Judd was an early benefactor—but settled in Los Angeles in the 1970’s. “New York is about New York, and LA is about the world,” he quips.


    From his West Coast home, Dill has indeed conquered the globe with his monumental sculptures in bronze, aluminum and marble. He’s mounted over 50 one-man exhibitions, and appears in the permanent collections of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, the Museum of Modern Art, and the Stedelijk Museum. Dill’s artworks in the Zane Bennett Contemporary collection exemplify the complete span of his process, from his initial explorations in two dimensions to a sculptural expression that towers above the viewer.

  • by Jordan Eddy
    JUDY CHICAGO: THE GODMOTHER
  • by Jordan Eddy
    CALL ME STELLA
  • by Jordan Eddy
    ELLSWORTH KELLY IN BLUE
  • by Jordan Eddy
    SOL LEWITT'S EMBLEMATA SERIES